Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Balancing Rest and Activity

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Topic Overview

Children who have juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) need a careful balance of rest and activity.

  • Children who have JIA may need extra naps or quiet time during the day to rest their joints and to regain their strength. JIA can be a tiring disease, especially when symptoms flare. Some medicines used to treat JIA may also cause tiredness.
  • Children are often good judges of their need for rest. Rest doesn't have to mean a nap. Reading quietly, watching a movie, or listening to music is fine, too. Let your child help decide when and how much rest he or she needs.
  • Rest is important. But it is just as important not to rest too much. Long periods without activity can cause your child's joints to stiffen and may eventually lead to weakness in unused muscles. Children who don't get enough activity are at greater risk for severe joint stiffening that results in deformities (contractures). Not being active also increases the chance that the child will become overweight.
  • It is also important not to overdo activity. Children often want to participate in activities with their friends and don't think about how they will feel the next day. Activity that causes pain or stiffness the following day is too much. That activity should be modified if tried again. For example, the child may play for a shorter time or play with lighter equipment.

Related Information


ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerSusan C. Kim, MD - Pediatrics
Specialist Medical ReviewerJohn Pope, MD - Pediatrics

Current as ofSeptember 9, 2014

Current as of: September 9, 2014