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Cytomegalovirus Infection

National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

Important
It is possible that the main title of the report Cytomegalovirus Infection is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

Synonyms

  • CMV
  • Cytomegalic Inclusion Disease
  • Giant Cell Inclusion Disease (CID)
  • Human Cytomegalovirus Infection
  • Salivary Gland Disease, CMV Type

Disorder Subdivisions

  • Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection
  • Acquired Cytomegalovirus Infection
  • Postperfusion Syndrome

General Discussion

Cytomegalovirus infection (CMV) is a viral infection that rarely causes obvious illness. The virus that causes CMV is part of the herpes virus family and, like other herpes viruses, may become dormant for a period of time and then be reactivated. CMV affects young children mainly, but it is estimated that by age 30 in the United States, half of all adults are, or have been, infected. The virus can pass from an infected, pregnant mother to her child through the shared blood supply (umbilical cord).

Physicians recognize three clinical forms of CMV. These include: (1) CMV inclusion disease of the newborn, which ranges in severity from being without symptoms to being a severe disease affecting the liver, spleen and central nervous system, with possible developmental disabilities; (2) Acute acquired CMV infection, which is similar to infectious mononucleosis and characterized by fever, a feeling of being not quite right (malaise), skeletal-muscular pain and the absence of a sore throat; (3) CMV in immuno-compromised persons (for instance, people who have had organ transplants or who have HIV) with increased risk for difficult eye infections (CMV retinitis), gastrointestinal CMV, and encephalitis.

Resources

National Congenital CMV Disease Registry
Feigin Center
Suite 1150
6621 Fannin Street
Houston, TX 77030-2399
USA
Tel: (832)824-4387
Fax: (832)825-4347
Email: cmv@bcm.edu
Internet: http://www.bcm.edu/pediatrics/index.cfm?Realm=99991126&This_Template=pedi_home.cfm

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
1600 Clifton Road NE
Atlanta, GA 30333
Tel: (404)639-3534
Tel: (800)232-4636
TDD: (888)232-6348
Email: cdcinfo@cdc.gov
Internet: http://www.cdc.gov/

NIH/National Eye Institute
31 Center Dr
MSC 2510
Bethesda, MD 20892-2510
United States
Tel: (301)496-5248
Fax: (301)402-1065
Email: 2020@nei.nih.gov
Internet: http://www.nei.nih.gov/

NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Office of Communications and Government Relations
6610 Rockledge Drive, MSC 6612
Bethesda, MD 20892-6612
Tel: (301)496-5717
Fax: (301)402-3573
Tel: (866)284-4107
TDD: (800)877-8339
Email: ocpostoffice@niaid.nih.gov
Internet: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/

Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
PO Box 8126
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
Tel: (301)251-4925
Fax: (301)251-4911
Tel: (888)205-2311
TDD: (888)205-3223
Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

Perkins School for the Blind
175 North Beacon Street
Watertown, MA 02472
Tel: (617)924-3434
Fax: (617)926-2027
Email: Info@Perkins.org
Internet: http://www.Perkins.org

National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness
The Teaching Research Institute
345 N. Monmouth Avenue
Monmouth, OR 97361
Tel: (800)438-9376
Fax: (503)838-8150
Tel: (800)438-9376
TDD: (800)854-7013
Email: info@nationaldb.org
Internet: http://www.nationaldb.org

For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

Last Updated:  4/10/2009
Copyright  1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2004, 2007, 2009 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

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